Essay Definition Urban

"Urbanized area" redirects here. For use of the term in relation to the United States Census, see List of United States urban areas.

An urban area is a human settlement with high population density and infrastructure of built environment. Urban areas are created through urbanization and are categorized by urban morphology as cities, towns, conurbations or suburbs. In urbanism, the term contrasts to rural areas such as villages and hamlets and in urban sociology or urban anthropology it contrasts with natural environment. The creation of early predecessors of urban areas during the urban revolution led to the creation of human civilization with modern urban planning, which along with other human activities such as exploitation of natural resources leads to human impact on the environment.

The world's urban population in 1950 of just 746 million has increased to 3.9 billion in the decades since.[1] In 2009, the number of people living in urban areas (3.42 billion) surpassed the number living in rural areas (3.41 billion) and since then the world has become more urban than rural.[2] This was the first time that the majority of the world's population lived in a city.[3] In 2014 there were 7.2 billion people living on the planet,[4] of which the global urban population comprised 3.9 billion. The Population Division of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs at that time predicted the urban population would grow to 6.4 billion by 2050, with 37% of that growth to come from three countries: China, India and Nigeria.[1]

Urban areas are created and further developed by the process of urbanization. Urban areas are measured for various purposes, including analyzing population density and urban sprawl.

Unlike an urban area, a metropolitan area includes not only the urban area, but also satellite cities plus intervening rural land that is socio-economically connected to the urban core city, typically by employment ties through commuting, with the urban core city being the primary labor market.

Definitions[edit]

European countries define urbanized areas on the basis of urban-type land use, not allowing any gaps of typically more than 200 metres (220 yd), and use satellite imagery instead of census blocks to determine the boundaries of the urban area. In less-developed countries, in addition to land use and density requirements, a requirement that a large majority of the population, typically 75%, is not engaged in agriculture and/or fishing is sometimes used.

Argentina[edit]

Main article: List of cities in Argentina by population

Argentina is highly urbanized.[5] The ten largest metropolitan areas account for half of the population, and fewer than one in ten live in rural areas. About 3 million people live in Buenos Aires City and the Greater Buenos Aires metropolitan area totals around 15 million, making it one of the largest urban areas in the world, with a population of 18 million all up.[6]

Córdoba has around 1.5 million people living in the urban area, while Rosario, Mendoza and Tucumán have around 1.2 million inhabitants each[6] and La Plata, Mar del Plata, Salta and Santa Fe[6][7] have at least 500,000 people each.

The population is unequally distributed amongst the provinces: about 60% live in the Pampa region (21% of the total area), including 20 million people in Buenos Aires Province; Córdoba ProvinceSanta Fe Province and the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires have 3 million each. Seven other provinces have over one million people each: Mendoza, Tucumán, Entre Ríos, Salta, Chaco, Corrientes and Misiones. Tucumán is the most densely populated with 60 per square kilometre (160/sq mi), the only Argentine province more densely populated than the world average, while the southern province of Santa Cruz has around 1 inhabitant per square kilometre (2.6/sq mi).

 

Largest cities or towns in Argentina
(2015 INDEC metro area estimate)[8]

RankNameProvincePop.RankNameProvincePop.

Buenos Aires

Córdoba
1Buenos Aires(Autonomous city)13,834,00011ResistenciaChaco409,000
Rosario

Mendoza
2CórdobaCórdoba1,519,00012Santiago del EsteroSantiago del Estero406,000
3RosarioSanta Fe1,429,00013CorrientesCorrientes383,000
4MendozaMendoza1,082,00014PosadasMisiones355,000
5TucumánTucumán868,00015San Salvador de JujuyJujuy338,000
6La PlataBuenos Aires836,00016NeuquénNeuquén309,000
7Mar del PlataBuenos Aires633,00017Bahía BlancaBuenos Aires307,000
8SaltaSalta625,00018ParanáEntre Ríos274,000
9Santa FeSanta Fe530,00019FormosaFormosa258,000
10San JuanSan Juan513,00020San LuisSan Luis218,000

Australia[edit]

Main article: List of cities in Australia by population

In Australia, urban areas are referred to as "urban centres" and are defined as population clusters of 1,000 or more people, with a density of at least 200/km2 (518/sq mi)[9] Australia is one of the most urbanised countries in the world, with more than 50% of the population residing in the 5 biggest cities.

 

Largest populated areas in Australia
2016 data from Australian Bureau of Statistics[10]

RankNameStatePop.RankNameStatePop.

Sydney

Melbourne
1SydneyNSW5,029,76811HobartTas224,462
Brisbane

Perth
2MelbourneVic4,725,31612GeelongVic192,393
3BrisbaneQld2,360,24113TownsvilleQld178,864
4PerthWA2,022,04414CairnsQld150,041
5AdelaideSA1,324,27915DarwinNT145,916
6Gold Coast–Tweed HeadsQld/NSW646,98316ToowoombaQld114,024
7Newcastle–MaitlandNSW436,17117BallaratVic101,588
8Canberra–QueanbeyanACT/NSW435,01918BendigoVic95,587
9Sunshine CoastQld317,40419Albury-WodongaNSW/Vic90,576
10WollongongNSW295,66920LauncestonTas86,335

Brazil[edit]

Main article: List of largest cities in Brazil

According to IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics) urban areas already concentrate 84.35% of the population, while the Southeast region remains the most populated one, with over 80 million inhabitants.[11] The largest metropolitan areas in Brazil are São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Belo Horizonte — all in the Southeastern Region — with 20, 12, and 5 million inhabitants respectively.[12] The majority of state capitals are the largest cities in their states, except for Vitória, the capital of Espírito Santo, and Florianópolis, the capital of Santa Catarina. There are also non-capital metropolitan areas in the states of São Paulo (Campinas, Santos and the Paraíba Valley), Minas Gerais (Steel Valley), Rio Grande do Sul (Sinos Valley) and Santa Catarina (Itajaí Valley).[13]

 

Largest metropolitan areas in Brazil
2016 Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics estimates[15]

RankNameStatePop.RankNameStatePop.

São Paulo

Rio de Janeiro
1São PauloSão Paulo21,242,93911ManausAmazonas2,568,817
Belo Horizonte

Brasília
2Rio de JaneiroRio de Janeiro12,330,18612Vale do Paraíba e Litoral NorteSão Paulo2,475,879
3Belo HorizonteMinas Gerais5,873,84113GoiâniaGoiás2,458,504
4BrasíliaDistrito Federal4,284,67614BelémPará2,422,481
5Porto AlegreRio Grande do Sul4,276,47515VitóriaEspírito Santo1,935,483
6FortalezaCeará4,019,21316SorocabaSão Paulo1,908,425
7SalvadorBahia3,984,58317Baixada SantistaSão Paulo1,813,033
8RecifePernambuco3,940,45618São LuísMaranhão1,605,305
9CuritibaParaná3,537,89419NatalRio Grande do Norte1,537,211
10CampinasSão Paulo3,131,52820PiracicabaSão Paulo1,452,691

Canada[edit]

Main article: List of the 100 largest population centres in Canada

According to Statistics Canada, an urban area in Canada is an area with a population of at least 1,000 people where the density is no fewer than 400 persons per square kilometre (1,000/sq mi).[16] If two or more urban areas are within 2 km (1.2 mi) of each other by road, they are merged into a single urban area, provided they do not cross census metropolitan area or census agglomeration boundaries.[17]

 

Largest cities or towns in Canada
2016 Census[18]

RankNameProvincePop.RankNameProvincePop.

Toronto

Montreal
1TorontoOntario2,731,57111Quebec CityQuebec531,902
Calgary

Ottawa
2MontrealQuebec1,704,69412SurreyBritish Columbia517,887
3CalgaryAlberta1,239,22013LavalQuebec422,993
4OttawaOntario934,24314HalifaxNova Scotia403,131
5EdmontonAlberta932,54615LondonOntario383,822
6MississaugaOntario721,59916MarkhamOntario328,966
7WinnipegManitoba705,24417VaughanOntario306,233
8VancouverBritish Columbia631,48618GatineauQuebec276,245
9BramptonOntario593,63819SaskatoonSaskatchewan246,376
10HamiltonOntario536,91720LongueuilQuebec239,700

In the Canada 2011 Census, Statistics Canada redesignated urban areas with the new term "population centre";[19] the new term was chosen in order to better reflect the fact that urban vs. rural is not a strict division, but rather a continuum within which several distinct settlement patterns may exist. For example, a community may fit a strictly statistical definition of an urban area, but may not be commonly thought of as "urban" because it has a smaller population, or functions socially and economically as a suburb of another urban area rather than as a self-contained urban entity, or is geographically remote from other urban communities. Accordingly, the new definition set out three distinct types of population centres: small (population 1,000 to 29,999), medium (population 30,000 to 99,999) and large (population 100,000 or greater).[19] Despite the change in terminology, however, the demographic definition of a population centre remains unchanged from that of an urban area: a population of at least 1,000 people where the density is no fewer than 400 persons per km2.

Colombia[edit]

Main article: List of cities in Colombia

In Colombia the largest Metropolitan area is Bogotá's, which has around 9.8 million of inhabitants and includes municipalities like Cota, La Calera, Chía, Soacha, Usaquen, Suba among others.., it's the metropolis of Culture, Business and Literature, Bogotá has been the International City of the Book and has places uniques like Monserrate, Torre Colpatria, Bolivar Square, BD Bacatá, Corferias, National University etc.[20][21]

 

Largest cities or towns in Colombia
National Administrative Department of Statistics (DANE), 2016 projections[22]

RankNameDepartmentPop.RankNameDepartmentPop.

Bogotá

Medellín
1BogotáBogotá7,963,37911Santa MartaMagdalena474,520
Cali

Barranquilla
2MedellínAntioquia2,457,68012VillavicencioMeta471,383
3CaliValle del Cauca2,358,30213BelloAntioquia458,196
4BarranquillaAtlántico1,219,38214PereiraRisaralda398,719
5CartagenaBolívar971,59215ValleduparCesar395,860
6CúcutaNorte de Santander634,27616BuenaventuraValle del Cauca373,717
7SoledadAtlántico631,59917PastoNariño371,045
8IbaguéTolima528,21418ManizalesCaldas369,981
9BucaramangaSantander521,85719MonteríaCórdoba346,873
10SoachaCundinamarca516,43520NeivaHuila324,375

China[edit]

Main article: List of cities in China by population and built-up area

Since 2000, China's cities have expanded at an average rate of 10% annually. It is estimated that China's urban population will increase by 292 million people by 2050,[1] when its cities will house a combined population of over one billion.[23] The country's urbanization rate increased from 17.4% to 46.6% between 1978 and 2009.[24] Between 150 and 200 million migrant workers work part-time in the major cities, returning home to the countryside periodically with their earnings.[25][26]

Today, China has dozens of cities with one million or more long-term residents, including the three global cities of Beijing, Hong Kong, and Shanghai; by 2025, the country will be home to 221 cities with over a million inhabitants.[23] The figures in the table below are from the 2008 census, and are only estimates of the urban populations within administrative city limits; a different ranking exists when considering the total municipal populations (which includes suburban and rural populations). The large "floating populations" of migrant workers make conducting censuses in urban areas difficult;[27] the figures below include only long-term residents.

 

Largest cities or towns in China
Sixth National Population Census of the People's Republic of China (2010)

RankNameProvincePop.RankNameProvincePop.

Shanghai

Beijing
1ShanghaiShanghai20,217,70011ChengduSichuan6,316,900
Chongqing

Guangzhou
2BeijingBeijing16,446,90012NanjingJiangsu6,238,200
3ChongqingChongqing11,871,20013ShenyangLiaoning5,718,200
4GuangzhouGuangdong10,641,40014HangzhouZhejiang5,578,300
5ShenzhenGuangdong10,358,40015Xi'anShaanxi5,399,300
6TianjinTianjin9,562,30016HarbinHeilongjiang5,178,000
7WuhanHubei7,541,50017SuzhouJiangsu4,083,900
8DongguanGuangdong7,271,30018QingdaoShandong3,990,900
9Hong KongHong Kong7,055,07119DalianLiaoning3,902,500
10FoshanGuangdong6,771,90020ZhengzhouHenan3,677,000

Finland[edit]

Main article: List of urban areas in Finland by population

Similar to other Nordic countries, an urban area (taajama in Finnish) in Finland must have a building at least every 200 m (660 ft) and at least 200 people. To be considered a town or a city (kaupunki) for statistical purposes, an urban area must have at least 15,000 people. This is not to be confused with the city / town designation used by municipalities.[29][30]

Greater Tokyo Area, Japan, the world's most populated urban area, with about 38 million inhabitants.

What are Urban Legends? Essay

1107 Words5 Pages

APS ISU – Urban Legends
What are Urban Legends?
How would one define an urban legend and what is it that differentiates it from other similar terms such as legends, myths and folklore? These terms tend to be group together, and for good reason considering they are all interrelated of each other as a means of storytelling.
A legend is established upon historic events but have a fictional component to them and possess great significance to the culture from where it was born. Examples include the legend of Robin Hood, who was an English outlaw that stole from the rich and gave to the poor.
A myth is characterised as being based upon a legend but achieves some symbolic meaning. The story is more fictional and uses supernatural accounts to…show more content…

APS ISU – Urban Legends
What are Urban Legends?
How would one define an urban legend and what is it that differentiates it from other similar terms such as legends, myths and folklore? These terms tend to be group together, and for good reason considering they are all interrelated of each other as a means of storytelling.
A legend is established upon historic events but have a fictional component to them and possess great significance to the culture from where it was born. Examples include the legend of Robin Hood, who was an English outlaw that stole from the rich and gave to the poor.
A myth is characterised as being based upon a legend but achieves some symbolic meaning. The story is more fictional and uses supernatural accounts to attempt to explain questions that have pondered us for centuries such as “where did we come from?” Ancient Greek mythology exploits many supernatural beings in their myths such as medusa and the Cyclops.
A folklore a story that is told from one generation to the next and it may have many variations of a single story based on the storyteller or the culture. There are many types of stories that are categorized under folklore such as fairy tales, fables and urban legends. Folklores, like the above, may or may not have been based on a true occurrence.
From this we can derive a spectrum of how these stories develop and the importance of the possible event the gave birth to the tale versus the message that is conveyed. By moving from one end

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