The Student Room Personal Statement Help For Law


Welcome to the personal statement builder tool

We'll guide you through the process of writing your UCAS personal statement for undergraduate study at a UK university. We'll get you to think about what course you're applying for, first writing notes about your experience, knowledge and hobbies, and then guide you through a suggested structure to actually write it. Afterwards, we'll check it against UCAS limitations and common errors and mistakes to help you write the best personal statement to reflect your interest and experiences.





What is a UCAS personal statement?

It is a formal document which allows you to 'communicate' with a university's admissions staff, explaining why you want to study the course you've chosen, and why you are suitable for studying it. It should be mainly academic with reference to books and debates you've engaged with, any relevant work experience and a small paragraph about relevant extra-curricular activities. If you're applying for a vocational course, it needs to convince the admissions staff that you are suitable and dedicated to a particular career (e.g. medicine). It is 47 lines, or 4000 characters long, whichever you hit first.

What isn't a UCAS personal statement?

Firstly, it is not a letter to the admissions staff and should therefore not be formatted like one, or address the admissions staff directly (i.e. not saying 'you' or 'yours' at all). The admissions staff will know that this is being read by other universities and this will appear insincere. A personal statement needs to be written in full prose and formal language, no bullet points or contractions. It's also not a personal essay discussing your life story or listing all of your achievements and experiences; it is about you but it should focus on your interests in studying your course. However, don't link everything to your course choice, only do it if the link isn't tenuous. At the other end of the spectrum, it isn't an academic essay where you just analyse what you've read. The 'personal' angle comes from why it's interested you. If the course is academic rather than vocational, you also shouldn't talk about doing the job (e.g. being a manager or psychologist), as you need to focus on why you want to study the course, rather than your career, after all, that is at least three years away. It's also not the place to talk about your module marks or discuss issues which have affected your results. If information like this is relevant, it should be included in your reference rather than in the personal statement.

Why is a personal statement important?

It's the first, and sometimes only, chance you have to express why you want to study the course you've chosen and to convince the admissions staff that you're capable. It is of particular importance when applying for competitive courses where the majority of the applicants meet the entry requirements in order to differentiate between candidates. For any course, it will be looked at if you miss your offer grades and could make the difference between your chosen university accepting you or being placed in Clearing. The statement is of particular importance if you are applying for a transfer, as a mature student or have an unusual educational background. It will most likely be used by universities that interview to base some of their questions on, so make sure you know the content of your statement.





What people say about our personal statement builder

"The tool will help you avoid the common pitfalls to ensure you deliver a truly personal statement."
Ethereal
"This tool supports applicants through the daunting process of writing their personal statement in an easily accessible way."
*Interrobang*
"The tool gives lots of structure and prompting for people who don't know where to start."
Glitterphobia

For many years, I have been interested in questions of right and wrong, in why conflict arises and how it can be resolved, and in looking at both sides of an argument. I maintain an interest in political processes and thought and am a strong supporter of democracy and the principle of justice. These are some of the reasons why I want to study Law

History is probably the school subject that best prepares me for the study of Law, since studying the past helps me make sense of the world we live in today. Through examination of source material, I have developed analytical skills, helping me understand the perspective of others and assess the significance of a date, statement or audience

During my AS-Level History course, I studied some of the most significant pieces of legislation in the history of Britain and Ireland, including the Act of Union of 1800/01, the Roman Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829 and the Great Reform Act of 1832

I had specific reasons for choosing my other A-Level subjects. I chose Biology because I have an interest in Genetics and Biotechnology, and the legal and ethical dilemmas that arise from these fields. I felt it was important to study Computing because computers are becoming increasingly essential tools. I decided to study Mathematics because of its emphasis on logical thought, and because it provides me with an intellectual challenge. I feel that this varied academic background will help me in my studies and in my ambition to become a well-rounded person

I have participated in a number of extra-curricular activities that I feel will aid me in my study of Law. My recent achievements include being highly commended for my representation of China on the Security Council at the **** College Model United Nations summit, being part of a team of four who won the Amnesty International The Rights Stuff debating competition and finishing runner-up in a Youth Leadership Competition organised by the Rotary Club. These activities have helped me to understand the importance of diplomacy and world citizenship. In order to have an opportunity to help people, I hope to volunteer to work for the RNIB next summer

In my spare time, I enjoy socialising with my friends, going to the cinema, using the Internet and reading. My favourite fictional work is Catch-22 by Joseph Heller, and I enjoy reading satire, such as Stupid White Men by Michael Moore. In the past few years, I have read biographies of Robert F. Kennedy, Albert Speer and John Nash, and I am currently reading legal textbooks. I also enjoy playing the clarinet

While I was a member of a jazz band, I went on concert tours to Washington DC and Boston, Massachusetts and played at the official opening of the Waterfront Hall, Belfast

When I finish my degree, I may undertake post-graduate study. I may then decide to enter the legal profession, or I may work in local, national or international government. The flexibility and versatility offered by a Law degree is one of the reasons why I wish to obtain one.

Comments

General Comments:

This statement is slightly shorter than it could be, particularly in terms of discussion of Law as a subject. The applicant seems to be focussing too much on his/her academic and extra-curricular record. The lack of full stops at the end of paragraphs is also a bad move, particularly when the character count allows plenty of extra space.

Comments on the statement:

For many years, I have been interested in questions of right and wrong, in why conflict arises and how it can be resolved, and in looking at both sides of an argument. I maintain an interest in political processes  and am a strong supporter of democracy and the principle of justice. These are some of the reasons why I want to study Law. This last sentence seems a bit bland, completing a paragraph that, as a whole, is rather clichéd. Apart from anything else, who is not a strong supporter of democracy and justice, barring evil would-be dictators?

History is probably the school subject that best prepares me for the study of Law, since studying the past helps me make sense of the world we live in today. Through examination of source material, I have developed analytical skills, helping me understand the perspective of others and assess the significance of a date, statement or audience .


During my AS-Level History course, I studied some of the most significant pieces of legislation in the history of Britain and Ireland, including the Act of Union of 1800/01, the Roman Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829 and the Great Reform Act of 1832. The relevance of this is slightly tenuous and it seems that the applicant is merely 'name-dropping' legislation. Mentioning how this has led to a greater understanding of how the legal system works or how this links to the study of current laws might be better.


I had specific reasons for choosing my other A-Level subjects. I chose Biology because I have an interest in Genetics and Biotechnology, and the legal and ethical dilemmas that arise from these fields. I felt it was important to study Computing because computers are becoming increasingly essential tools. I decided to study Mathematics because of its emphasis on logical thought, and because it provides me with an intellectual challenge. I feel that this varied academic background will help me in my studies and in my ambition to become a well-rounded person.

Paragraphs 2 and 4 above would probably be best contained in one, shorter paragraph. Something like "My subjects were chosen with the aim of preparing me for the rigours of a Law degree. History in particular should be helpful to me, as studying the past helps me make sense of the world we live in today. Through examination of source material, I have developed analytical skills, helping me understand the perspective of others and assess the significance of a date, statement or audience. Biology increased my interest in Genetics and Biotechnology, and the legal and ethical dilemmas that arise from these fields. I chose Maths and Computing in addition to these so that I could increase my knowledge in different fields, helping me to broaden my academic background.


I have participated in a number of extra-curricular activities that I feel will aid me in my study of Law. My recent achievements include being highly commended for my representation of China on the Security Council at the **** College Model United Nations summit, being part of a team of four who won the Amnesty International The Rights Stuff debating competition and finishing runner-up in a Youth Leadership Competition organised by the Rotary Club. These activities have helped me to understand the importance of diplomacy and world citizenship. In order to have an opportunity to help people, I hope to volunteer to work for the RNIB next summer . Lists are often best avoided, but these achievements are quite impressive, and do have a point. The last sentence, however, seems comparatively weak and uncertain and would be best deleted.

In my spare time, I enjoy socialising with my friends, going to the cinema, using the Internet and reading. My favourite fictional work is Catch-22 by Joseph Heller, and I enjoy reading satire, such as Stupid White Men by Michael Moore. In the past few years, I have read biographies of Robert F. Kennedy, Albert Speer and John Nash, and I am currently reading legal textbooks. I also enjoy playing the clarinet While I was a member of a jazz band, I went on concert tours to Washington DC and Boston, Massachusetts and played at the official opening of the Waterfront Hall, Belfast . This paragraph is quite random and, when taken in addition to the paragraph above, means this statement places far too much emphasis on extra-curricular activities. A better use of the words available would be to discuss an issue raised by the applicant's reading of legal texts, or even to go back to the "legal and ethical dilemmas" which stem from the applicant's study of Biology.

When I finish my degree, I may undertake post-graduate study. I may then decide to enter the legal profession, or I may work in local, national or international government. The flexibility and versatility offered by a Law degree  are just two of the reasons why I wish to obtain one. The last sentence would be better placed first in this paragraph, and the first two sentences need further work, particularly with their overuse of "may"


Article by TSR User on Thursday 15 February 2018

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *